Tattoo Removal on the rise due to Unemployment?

A new report out this week indicates that more people nationwide are having their tattoos removed over concerns about employment.

The study, from dermatology group “The Patients’ Guide,” shows that in the past year, 32-percent more tattoo removals occurred nationwide. Of those surveyed who had tattoos removed, two out of five cited concerns over employment or hiring as the reason.

IRVINE, Calif., May 22, 2012 /PRNewswire/ – In a study looking at tattoo removal demand over the last two years, The Patient’s Guide® reports that laser tattoo removal procedures climbed 32% from 2011 to 2012. Survey data cited “Employment Reasons” as the new leading factor driving demand. The study looked at patient appointment data from 205 of the top aesthetic medical practices across the country, and 700 patient surveys collected on TattooRemoval.net (see here). “We’ve seen a marked increase in tattoo removal laser appointments,” said Jasson W. Gilmore, CEO & Co-Founder of The Patient’s Guide. “The increased awareness of laser tattoo removal, economic pressure and the explosion in tattoo popularity have all converged to drive up demand for this procedure.”

“There’s been a significant increase in the number of patients who desire tattoo removal for career advancement or for employment reasons,” says Dr. Eric Bernstein, renowned laser expert and Associate Clinical Professor at University of Pennsylvania.  “I think this is as wrong as any other kind of discrimination, but patients tell me that their tattoos are affecting their professional lives.  Many feel that their body could be holding them back and this has resulted in more folks seeking tattoo removal.”

Through The Patient Guide’s proprietary appointment tracking system, aggregate data was analyzed for in-office laser tattoo reduction procedures and was collected for 2 years in locations throughout North America.  Survey data from over 700 participants was then collected to better understand patient demographics and motivations.  Patients were asked to indicate their main reason for initiating the treatment.  The leading selection was ‘Employment Reasons’ which accounted for a whopping 40% of all submissions, followed by ‘Name of Ex-Partner/Spouse’ (18%), ‘Change of Beliefs’ (16%), ‘Other’ (15%), and ‘Unhappy/Don’t Like it’ (11%).  “Employment reasons is up from 25% on a similar study done last year,” said Mr. Gilmore. “It would appear that the economy is driving patients to seek laser treatment that may have otherwise not been interested in doing so.”

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3 Responses to Tattoo Removal on the rise due to Unemployment?

  1. Steve Golliot Villers says:

    This survey should also point the fact that tattoo removal lasers are getting cheaper and cheaper, and here in Europe a lot of tattoo shops get equiped as I guess a lot of shops worldwide…

  2. Elaine Bowes says:

    I read about laser tattoo removal on your blog and http://www.newlookhouston.com and found it fascinating that treatments are spaced six weeks apart to allow the lymphatic system to flush the shattered tattoo ink from the body. I’m a new biomedical engineering student so this problem got me thinking if lab-designed hemoglobin-like proteins that bind with metals in the ink molecules could be injected subcutaneously to help flush them sooner. Proteins are organic molecules so the body would absorb any residuals and use the amino acids to build other proteins. Such treatments may offer the promise of removing tattoos faster and therefore the potential for higher revenues and profits.

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